Dendritic Cell Diagram

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Dendritic Cell Diagram

Dendritic Cell Diagram: The cell is the basic unit of life, as it is present under one type or another in all forms of living. The blood white cells are definitely among the most important ones, because they have the role of defending the body against infectious diseases or any other foreign material. Also called leukocytes, white cells are divided into several types: neutrophiles, eosinophiles, basophiles, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Each and every single white cell has its own cell diagram. Here is the cell diagram of the dendritic cell.

Dendritic Cell Diagram

Paul Langerhans is the one who first discovered the dendritic cell, in the late 19th century. However, the ones who conceived the name ‘dendritic cell’ and first came up with the appropriate cell diagram were Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil A. Cohn. Despite this fact, dendritic cells are still known nowadays as Langerhans cells. As you can see in the aforementioned cell diagram, dendritic cells are immune cells, being a part of the mammalian immune system. Their role is to process antigen material and then present it on the surface to other types of immune cells. Dendritic cells can be found in the tissues which have contact with the external environment: skin, nose, intestines, stomach and blood. Sometimes, they can be present in the blood, but in an immature state. After they are activated, dendritic cells interact with T cells and B cells (which are lymphocytes), in order to initiate the adaptive immune response.

Don’t confuse type of cells…

Be careful though, because these types of dendritic cells can often be confused with the dendrites of neurons. While they may look alike, their function is completely different, and their cell diagram as well. Dendritic cells act like messengers, as they facilitate the communication between the innate and adaptive community. Thus, dendritic cells function as antigen-presenting cells. There are 3 types of dendritic cells: in vivo, in vitro and nonprimate. The ‘in vivo’ ones are the dendritic cells which are produced in a natural way, while the ‘in vitro’ ones are cultured and used mainly for research. This cell diagram will teach you which are the components of a dendritic cell and the process on which it is based on.

 

Dendritic Cell Diagram